Time2Track Blog

Real-Life Resources for Behavioral Health Students & Early Career Professionals

Is Religion Welcome in Current Clinical Practice?

Is Religion Welcome in Current Clinical Practice?

In the early history of psychotherapy, research on integrating faith and spirituality did not arouse much interest [1]. However, this attitude has changed in the latter part of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. Psychology has, of late, experienced a paradigm shift with an increased openness to religion and spirituality [2]. This paradigm shift refers to the significant change in historical practices in science [3]. It is suggested that counselors, when building a therapeutic alliance with clients, explore and encourage spiritual expression at the client’s discretion. Current research also suggests individuals with a religious and/or spiritual worldview typically find comfort in their religious or spiritual beliefs and practices during times of un¬certainty or crisis.

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5 Tips for Acing Your First IEP Meeting

5 Tips for Acing Your First IEP Meeting

As a private practice psychologist who specializes in educational consultation and school-based behavioral health, I have sat in on hundreds of IEP meetings.

Students and interns in school-based settings often play an essential role in IEP (Individualized Education Plan) meetings. Many trainees are supervised in administering, interpreting, and reporting on psychological assessment data – which can be quite an intimidating task for new student psychologists.

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How to get the most out of supervision — and what they don’t tell you in school

How to get the most out of supervision — and what they don’t tell you in school

During graduate school, my cohort was often posed with the question of how to respond to various ethical dilemmas. It became a running joke to always answer with one of the following: “It depends,” or “Ask your supervisor.” Before I began to see patients, “ask your supervisor” seemed easy enough to do. In reality, supervision can be a complicated process. At the same time, supervision is an amazing resource that can elevate your professional development. Read on for some considerations for getting the most out of supervision from start to finish.

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Adverse childhood experiences: Traumas that set the framework for life

Adverse childhood experiences: Traumas that set the framework for life

Growing up in a home with physical abuse, emotional neglect, mental illness, alcohol use, or drug use are some examples of childhood adversities. The seminal work of Dr. Vincent Felitti and colleagues asked over 17,000 adults to answer questions about adverse childhood experiences — or ACEs — and current health [1]. Results were shocking: More ACEs led to poorer health in adulthood and early death.

It is important to understand that ACEs do not directly cause poor outcomes; there are likely many mediating mechanisms such as maladaptive coping, unhealthy interpersonal relationships, negative health behaviors, dysfunctional thinking styles, and insecure attachments that contribute to these outcomes. In addition to prevention efforts, these are all potential areas that therapists can intervene to mitigate the long-term effects of adversity.

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What Does it Look Like to Not Match with an APPIC Internship?

What Does it Look Like to Not Match with an APPIC Internship?

Let me paint a picture: You partied with your classmates, convinced yourself you’re qualified, and reached the culmination of the didactic portion of your training. You battled automatic thoughts like, “I’ll be the only person in my cohort who doesn’t match; I’ll be embarrassed; Everyone will think I’m not ready for internship; They’ll be talking about me and I won’t even know it.” You convinced yourself that you won’t be one of those people who don’t match.

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How to Communicate with Doctors as a Behavioral Health Professional

How to Communicate with Doctors as a Behavioral Health Professional

The first time I worked with a physician was during my training as a suicide risk assessment consultant in a hospital.

My job was simple: give the nice doctor a brief run-through of the patient presentation and make recommendations for treatment. I walked into the doctor’s office, smiled, took a deep breath, and I began to regale them with the tale of my time with the patient and how they made me feel.

After about thirty seconds, my story was cut short.

The doctor shook his head, raised his hand, and said “you’re burning my time buddy, just tell me what I need to do.” Caught off guard and sweating profusely, I managed to stumble through some recommendations before the physician said “sounds great” and turned back to his notes.

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4 Ways to Build a Paperless Private Practice

4 Ways to Build a Paperless Private Practice

Starting a private practice comes with many steps. You have to think about everything from office space to insurance credentialing to finding the right staff. Each one of these steps comes with its own plethora of paperwork.

Getting your practice off the ground is no easy feat and trust us when we say you don’t want anything weighing you down as you’re trying to grow — especially not file cabinets filled with paperwork.

Though creating a paperless practice may seem overwhelming, it doesn’t have to be — especially if you are intentional about creating a paper-free office from the beginning.

Whether you’re already committed to creating a paperless office or you’re on the fence about letting go of your treasured file cabinets, read on to learn what benefits a paperless office holds and how you can go paperless with a few easy steps.

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How I Confronted A Family Crisis During Grad School

How I Confronted A Family Crisis During Grad School

I don’t remember much about grad school orientation day. I do remember being completely dismissive about the whole affair, wanting nothing more than to just hit the ground running. I remember a speaker saying, “Life happens while you’re here.” I laughed off that comment and thought, Life won’t “happen” until four years from now when I’m finally in the real world doing what I love. Like the rest of that speech, the rest of orientation day remains a blur.

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