Time2Track Blog

Real-Life Resources for Behavioral Health Students & Early Career Professionals

4 Ways to Build a Paperless Private Practice

4 Ways to Build a Paperless Private Practice

Starting a private practice comes with many steps. You have to think about everything from office space to insurance credentialing to finding the right staff. Each one of these steps comes with its own plethora of paperwork.

Getting your practice off the ground is no easy feat and trust us when we say you don’t want anything weighing you down as you’re trying to grow — especially not file cabinets filled with paperwork.

Though creating a paperless practice may seem overwhelming, it doesn’t have to be — especially if you are intentional about creating a paper-free office from the beginning.

Whether you’re already committed to creating a paperless office or you’re on the fence about letting go of your treasured file cabinets, read on to learn what benefits a paperless office holds and how you can go paperless with a few easy steps.

read more
How I Confronted A Family Crisis During Grad School

How I Confronted A Family Crisis During Grad School

I don’t remember much about grad school orientation day. I do remember being completely dismissive about the whole affair, wanting nothing more than to just hit the ground running. I remember a speaker saying, “Life happens while you’re here.” I laughed off that comment and thought, Life won’t “happen” until four years from now when I’m finally in the real world doing what I love. Like the rest of that speech, the rest of orientation day remains a blur.

read more
How to Land Your Ideal Research Postdoc

How to Land Your Ideal Research Postdoc

If you are thinking about postdoctoral positions, you have likely survived graduate school, the internship match, a doctoral dissertation defense, and are close to being able to tack “Dr.” to the beginning of your name for the rest of your life. Congratulations!

After the relief of securing internship training, it may come as a surprise when your internship supervisors encourage you to think about postdoc fellowships in just the first weeks of internship. Regardless of career goals, most clinical psychology students end up pursuing postdoc training. Postdoc training is required for licensure in most US states, and also required for American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) certification.

read more
To Friend or Not to Friend: A Guide for When a Client Connects with You on Social Media

To Friend or Not to Friend: A Guide for When a Client Connects with You on Social Media

Although previous generations probably did not swap cat pictures or tell 350 of their acquaintances what they ate for dinner, even the most seasoned among us has to pause when we think about life before social media. People use their private social media accounts for a variety of reasons and clinicians are no different. Perhaps you are looking for a new job or even a relationship through social media. Or maybe you use social media to decompress by doing online workouts and watching Dr. Pimple Popper videos. Whatever the case, the chances are good you will run into a client on social media. This article explores some of the most common scenarios a clinician will encounter and the ethical implications of receiving a friend request from a client. Here are some of the most common scenarios you will encounter in the field.

read more
Breaking Mental Health Stigma Among Ethnic Minority Clients

Breaking Mental Health Stigma Among Ethnic Minority Clients

Mental health stigma in ethnic minority communities can create critical barriers to treatment for groups including African Americans, Latinx Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. One of the primary contributors to disparities in mental health treatment is mental health stigma, which refers to a collection of negative attitudes, thoughts, behaviors, or beliefs that help to facilitate fear, rejection, and discrimination against people with mental illness1.

read more
The Ultimate Guide to Suicide Assessment

The Ultimate Guide to Suicide Assessment

Suicide is a significant public health concern. Approximately 44,965 Americans die by suicide each year [1]. This equates to approximately 123 suicides per day. Recent reports have indicated a 30% increase in suicide rates from 1999 to 2016 (10.5 per 100,000 to 13.4 per 100,000) [2]. Additionally, we know that suicide does not only affect those with a diagnosed mental health condition. The CDC data notes that approximately half of those who died by suicide between 1999 and 2016 did not have a known mental health condition [2]. Though a mental health condition can be a risk factor for suicide, other factors that can contribute to suicide include stress related to relationships, finances, jobs, housing, substance use, or physical health. The ubiquity of suicide and the increase in suicide rates over the last 17 years support the importance of community suicide education and consistent suicide assessment, intervention, and treatment among clinicians interacting with individuals at increased suicide risk.

read more
Managing Chronic Illness during Graduate School

Managing Chronic Illness during Graduate School

Graduate school is an enormous feat for any student. Many graduate students may be employed, have children, or may even be dealing with serious health issues while attending graduate school. I, personally, fit in each of those categories. I’m currently a graduate student pursuing a Master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling. I’m also a mother to a ten year old energetic son, and I’m dealing with health issues as well.

read more
Getting the Interview: How to Build a Winning APPIC Application

Getting the Interview: How to Build a Winning APPIC Application

If you are reading this article, you are most likely in the midst of building your APPIC application or are gearing up to do so. First, congratulations! It is a lot of work to get this far, and there is light at the end of the tunnel! Yet, like every other aspect of grad school, there is a lot of work that goes into building your application and it can seem incredibly daunting. During my first internship prep meeting, we were warned that preparing our APPIC application and applying for internship was essentially a “part-time job.”

read more
Want to Be a Psychologist? Research Your Way into Graduate School

Want to Be a Psychologist? Research Your Way into Graduate School

Talk to anyone who has completed their clinical training, and they will tell you becoming a psychologist is a process that begins early in your academic career. Laying the groundwork during your undergraduate years can provide a strong foothold into the field as well as into a graduate training program. One of the best ways to get involved as a student is to take advantage of the opportunities provided by your local undergraduate institutions. Universities are active breeding grounds for social science research and frequently employ students for pay or course credit.

read more