Decolonizing Psychology Programs: A User’s Guide

Decolonizing Psychology Programs: A User’s Guide

When the conquistadors came to the Americas, they were in search of wealth. They brought mass genocide, sickness, and they left countless communities in biological, psychological, political, social, and spiritual turmoil that has lasted for generations. With this destruction, colonialism began. Maldonado-Torres (2007) argues that coloniality is the patterns of power that came out of colonialism, particularly around race [1]. Coloniality looks different now, and we see it in overt and covert ways, particularly in how people within systems relate to each other. Maldonado-Torres writes that it survives through “books, in the criteria for academic performance, in cultural patterns, in common sense, in self-image, in aspirations of self, and in many aspects of modern experience” [1]. It also survives in psychology, mental health counseling, and social work programs. In order to create true cultures of awareness, equity, and justice, our programs must separate from the overt and covert ways that coloniality endures. Decolonizing programs not only benefits the faculty and students who are a part of that system, but it will also have a significant impact on the people we serve. By creating a system that is continually striving to decolonize, we will stop re-colonizing our patients with...
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Navigating Negative Feedback: What I Learned as a Peer Supervisor

Navigating Negative Feedback: What I Learned as a Peer Supervisor

To move into expertise, we need a sage guide to show us where we excel and where we need to improve. All learning processes involve some negative feedback, whether it involves learning to skateboard or pay your utility bills. Psychologists provide positive and negative feedback to people and organizations in many arenas. Learning to give helpful feedback as a peer supervisor takes experience, mentorship, and trust in your knowledge and expertise. One of my clinical supervisors described feedback as similar to the way a physical therapist views rehabilitation after an injury; while we all need (and prefer) a massage, recovery requires exercising the muscles in painful ways. It is the painful exercising that returns the tissue to strength. Positive feedback is the massage; negative feedback is the jumps, stretches, and pulls that take us to new levels of ability in our clinical training. Providing peer supervision developed my identity as a supervisor. I accepted a position to be a teaching assistant for the most challenging course in our program. It was my third year of graduate training, and stress was high. The assignments demanded students spend hours meticulously grading test protocols while juggling the demands of clinical rotations, research, and maintaining a social life....
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11 Strategies to Maximize Productivity While Working From Home

11 Strategies to Maximize Productivity While Working From Home

Working from home is a new experience for many people. If you are similar to me, the house has many distractions that limit your productivity. I am a neuropsychology student and researcher on the topic of executive functioning – your brain’s ability to engage in attention, planning, impulse control, decision-making, and thinking flexibility. I believe the recommendations I provide to my patients will also be helpful to you in this time. The following strategies will help you maximize productivity while working from home. Note: I recognize I do not have the added factor of caretaking for children. Parents, you are heroes. Please take what is helpful from this and ignore what isn’t. No one can apply these concepts perfectly (especially me), but maybe one or two will make a huge difference.  1. Think of Your Attentional Abilities as a Ruler. As the day goes on without a rest period, you lose inch after inch until you are staring at a computer screen and forget what day and time it is. Working from home has so many distractions that you are doing the same job, but with less of your ruler. To increase your ruler, it is important to replenish your mental energy. 2. Give Yourself Self-Compassion and Plan it Into Your Life. I recommend you plan for one and a half the typical...
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“Please, Sir, May I Have Some More?” How to Get the Most Hours Out of Your Clinical Placement

“Please, Sir, May I Have Some More?” How to Get the Most Hours Out of Your Clinical Placement

Doctoral students have the enormous task of balancing clinical work, research, teaching and coursework; all while ensuring they have enough clinical hours to be competitive for the process of applying for internship. If your clinical placement is not getting you the hours you need, it can add unneeded stress. Here are some tips for each stage of the process to help you advocate for your training needs successfully.


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5 Ways to Earn More Face-to-Face Hours

5 Ways to Earn More Face-to-Face Hours

After putting many years of time and effort into academic coursework and clinical training, the final culmination of the doctoral degree ends in an internship year where students expand their knowledge and training and stretch themselves in infinite ways. Reaching this point assumes that you have had a requisite number of direct clinical service hours that include foundational competencies in intervention or assessment. Since many states allow for pre-doctoral hours to count as supervised clinical experience toward licensure eligibility, considerable attention is paid to issues such as hours, competencies, assessment, and supervision [1]. Indeed, intervention and assessment hours have been found to significantly influence the number of interviews internship applicants receive, suggesting that monitoring the type of clinical training hours you accrue is important throughout pre-internship training [2]. However, one of the inherent challenges many often face in their training experiences is how to acquire more quality face-to-face hours to meet a developmental trajectory and increase competitiveness for internship sites.    The pie and bar graphs on Time2Track provide a continuous reminder of how many hours you have completed and how many more you must obtain to increase your...
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Telesupervision: How Remote Supervision Can Help

Telesupervision: How Remote Supervision Can Help

Telehealth is making gains in popularity for providers and clients alike, but the majority of clinical supervision takes place face-to-face. Telesupervision, though, allows for supervisor and supervisee to meet without being in the same room. Here’s a bit more about telesupervision and how it can be helpful for supervisors, supervisees, and training programs. What is Telesupervision? Telesupervision, also known as e-supervision, is defined as the use of video conferencing technologies to supervise graduate students or assistants remotely. Supervisors can utilize video conferencing technologies to meet with students to discuss their objectives, assignments, and caseload, and to provide feedback. Supervision via video conferencing also allows supervisors to observe students working with clients or patients during live online sessions (telehealth sessions). What are the Benefits of Telesupervision for Universities? Telesupervision can help with clinical placements in a cost- and time-efficient manner. It can eliminate barriers such as distance or bad weather conditions that supervisors might face in providing weekly supervision. Telesupervision can decrease travel time from facility to facility, allowing supervisors to focus on supervision itself. It can also help with training...
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How to get the most out of supervision — and what they don’t tell you in school

How to get the most out of supervision — and what they don’t tell you in school

During graduate school, my cohort was often posed with the question of how to respond to various ethical dilemmas. It became a running joke to always answer with one of the following: “It depends,” or “Ask your supervisor.” Before I began to see patients, “ask your supervisor” seemed easy enough to do. In reality, supervision can be a complicated process. At the same time, supervision is an amazing resource that can elevate your professional development. Read on for some considerations for getting the most out of supervision from start to finish.


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