Articles by Daniel S. Newman, PhD, NCSP

Daniel S. Newman, Ph.D., NCSP, received his doctorate from the University of Maryland, College Park and is currently an assistant professor at National Louis University in Illinois. He currently teaches and supervises courses in school consultation, clinical supervision, and a school psychology internship seminar, and is co-chair of the National Association of School Psychologists Early Career Workgroup. His book, Demystifying the School Psychology Internship: A Dynamic Guide for Interns and Supervisors, was released this December by Routledge.

Clarifying Supervision Goals for Psychology Students & Supervisors

Clarifying Supervision Goals for Psychology Students & Supervisors

This is the final blog post in a three-part series exploring topics related to graduate students’ practicum and internship experiences.

The first post focused on how students can track clinical hours in a way that is meaningful, and the second post looked at the features of an effective practicum or internship plan.

In the current post, several complexities of supervision during practicum/internship are identified, and ways to achieve clearer supervision expectations are discussed.

The post is based on the big idea that supervision is a pivotal part of practicum/internship experiences, but supervision processes need increased clarity for students and supervisors to be maximally effective. The content is adapted from my recently published book Demystifying the School Psychology Internship: A Dynamic Guide for Interns and Supervisors (New York: Routledge).

Definition and Goals of Supervision

Supervision is generally recognized as the signature pedagogy in psychology.

Making Clinical Hours Personally & Professionally Meaningful

Making Clinical Hours Personally & Professionally Meaningful

If you are a graduate student in psychology (or related discipline) completing practicum or internship work, you are likely required by your university to keep track of your fieldwork hours and activities. On the surface this may feel like busy work. For example, a school psychology intern I supervised jokingly asked me whether or not the time she spent logging her hours could be counted as hours.

In a series of four blog posts, I have been asked by the developers of Time2Track to reflect on how students can meaningfully incorporate the tracking of hours and activities during field experiences. In each post, I will highlight one of four big ideas integrated in my forthcoming book, Demystifying the School Psychology Internship: A Dynamic Guide for Interns and Supervisors (New York: Routledge).