Articles by Traci W. Olivier, Psy.D.

Dr. Traci W. Olivier completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at Nova Southeastern University, concentrating in neuropsychology, followed by an internship in pediatric neuropsychology and consultation at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is currently a second-year pediatric neuropsychology postdoctoral fellow at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Her clinical and research interests include psychology across the lifespan, fostering resilience in patients and clinicians, the neuropsychological sequelae of brain tumors and cancer-directed treatments, and the impact of deafness on language-related processes and functional outcomes. A few of her favorite things include a cup of café au lait, anything Louisiana, and spending time with her husband. More information on her recent book entitled <em>Innovative Approaches to Individual and Community Resilience: From Theory to Practice</em>, <a href="https://www.elsevier.com/books/innovative-approaches-to-individual-and-community-resilience/nemeth/978-0-12-803851-2">can be found here</a>. She can be reached at <a href="mailto:traci.olivier@stjude.org">traci.olivier@stjude.org</a>.

Becoming a Resilient Clinician

Becoming a Resilient Clinician

The concept of resilience has become quite a popular one lately. There are countless articles, workshops, lectures, and even centers that focus on resilience.

But what exactly is it? And from where does it come?

Is it an inherited personality trait predetermined by genetics? Or is it something that can be taught, fostered, and developed? Perhaps more importantly, why do some people seem so much better at it than others?

These are exactly the kinds of questions that have inspired my colleague, Dr. Darlyne Nemeth, and me to probe deeper into the concept of resilience. Our research and experiences eventually transpired into a book, which was recently published.

We described the hallmark of resilient people as being grounded in today, learning how to benefit from yesterday, and imagining themselves in tomorrow. Resilience is not just about surviving, but also about thriving in the midst of challenge.