Articles by Jon Weingarden, PsyD

As the program director of the Integrative Health and Aging Program at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC and Kane Glen Hazel's behavioral health residential nursing facility, I function as a clinician, an administrator and a manager. Prior to this, I completed an Internship at Carnegie Mellon University's Counseling and Psychology Services to finish my PsyD (Psychology Doctorate) program in Counseling Psychology at Chatham University. Prior work experience includes community mental health at Staunton Clinic, UPMC's trauma and borderline personality disorders inpatient unit, multiple bipolar disorder treatment studies including light therapy and interpersonal social rhythm therapy, and at Chatham University as a doctoral student practicum site supervisor and TA for master's level statistics. I practice from an integrated theoretical orientation informed primarily by Sullivanian Interpersonal Psychotherapy. This includes, but is not limited to, various psychodynamic therapies, Cognitive and dialectical Behavior Therapies, and Gestalt / Experiential approaches.

Attention Psychotherapists… You’re Going to Fail.

Attention Psychotherapists… You’re Going to Fail.

And there’s nothing you can do about it! You have to fail. You must fail… If you want to succeed.

To foster a patient who loves himself, warts and all, therapists must accept and own their foibles and follies. To the best of my knowledge, there is no greater strength than the courage to look our demons straight in the eye. This is a question – “what are your strengths and weaknesses?” – you will face at comprehensive exams and internship interviews; my answer always begins, “they are one-and-the-same: my greatest strength is how I have grown from my weaknesses.”

Uncertainty, Transference, & Other Reasons Therapists Might Fail

Uncertainty, Transference, & Other Reasons Therapists Might Fail

We often know our goal, but rarely what lies in our way. “There is a road, no simple highway” (Hunter, The Grateful Dead, 1970). At times, we may find that no matter what we try, we cannot seem to overcome the problem and reach our goal – our cabin on the hillside.

No matter how hard we wish, for some problems there is no simple highway – no quick-fix, deus-ex-machina, five-step solution, or magic wand.

These are the points in life when people most often turn to psychotherapy; they have tried everything and, to varying degrees, may have a fantasy that psychotherapists have some top-secret piece of advice. Especially therapists-in-training who are excited about helping, anxious to prove their competence, and unfamiliar with the uncertainty of the therapeutic process might find themselves colluding with this client’s wish for a magic solution in order to reduce both parties’ uncertainty.

How I Failed My Client in Psychotherapy and Grew From it

How I Failed My Client in Psychotherapy and Grew From it

From Cindy’s pressed lips, lined with wrinkles that extended noticeably beyond her years, came exasperated concerns of torturous anxiety.

Deeper than her polite solemnity, there seemed to be a well of sadness. This sadness pervaded her down-turned lips, slow gate, and slumped posture. Cindy’s helpless presentation pulled at my heart-strings; in particular as a young therapist-in-training, I wanted to help. I listened empathically, encouraged her strengths, taught skills such as deep-breathing, and offered advice.

However, like clockwork, every 15 minutes Cindy’s down-turned, sad lips would slowly become pursed with frustration. Pursed like a toddler refusing a big spoonful of syrupy cough-medicine. Shutting off, and shutting me out.