Therapist Burnout & How to Prevent It

Therapist Burnout & How to Prevent It

Ever notice yourself getting a little more irritable than normal? Finding it difficult to interact with colleagues, clients, and even family or friends? Struggling to find empathy and patience for others? This could be the result of therapist burnout. Yes, even therapists get burned out and need to take a step back in order to take care of our own needs.

Therapist burnout happens when an individual’s psychological resources are overpowered by the demands placed on them. It is an extreme kind of exhaustion that can result from working with particularly challenging populations [1].

Not only does burnout cause us to simply feel terrible, but it also contributes to job dissatisfaction and poor job performance. Further, it can lead to frantic job searches, and, at the extreme end, it can result in ethical violations, which may have professional repercussions for the therapist – and may harm the client.

Your Plan for Therapist / Client “Real World” Interactions

Your Plan for Therapist / Client “Real World” Interactions

Imagine that on that you are at the grocery store on a Saturday morning for a quick stop to get some milk, and you spot one of your clients just a few places in front of you in the checkout line.

What do you do?

Should you wave to them? Walk up and ask if they were able to work things out with their significant other? Remind them of their appointment this Monday (since they missed their last one)? Ignore them and frantically try not to make eye contact?

If this situation is new to you, you may experience some panic.

Making the Best of Unplanned Client Termination

Making the Best of Unplanned Client Termination

Client termination, whether it is planned or unplanned, is difficult.

It can lead the clinician to having a multitude of emotions. After all, it is the ending of a relationship, which can be a challenging thing for any of us to go through.

To make it harder, most individuals are not taught appropriate techniques to end a relationship. How many of us plan on how we are going to conclude a relationship? We are social beings at heart and are not often focused on planning for the conclusion of a connection nor are we trained in healthy ways to process the ending of a relationship.

Despite these challenges, it is important for clinicians to always be focused on the possibility of termination in order to gain comfort and understanding of how it impacts both the client and clinician.

6 Ways to Prep for the EPPP that Don’t Involve Studying

6 Ways to Prep for the EPPP that Don’t Involve Studying

One of the final hurdles in obtaining your psychology license is prepping for and passing the EPPP.

This process is often extremely anxiety provoking – the last thing you want to do after completing the exhaustive undertaking of earning your doctorate degree is study for an all-inclusive exam of what you should have learned over the past several years of education, right?

The anxiety factor alone is enough for many people to put off preparing for the exam.